LISTEN: Meet the Mesothelioma Experts Interview with Drs. Simone and Alley Now Available

Penn MedicineOn Thursday, May 14, the Meso Foundation interviewed Dr. Charles Simone and Dr. Evan Alley of the University of Pennsylvania Medicine during the Meet the Mesothelioma Experts series. The session was part of a series of interviews focusing on mesothelioma centers of excellence. Drs. Simone and Alley were interviewed by the Meso Foundation’s executive director, Mary Hesdorffer, with whom they discussed the mesothelioma program at the University of Pennsylvania Medicine.

The full interview is now available on demand on the Meso Foundation’s website at curemeso.org/experts.

Drs. Alley and Simone are the co-directors of the Penn Mesothelioma and Pleural Program. Dr. Alley is a medical oncologist and is the leading investigator in the PD-1 inhibitor trial that has recently made big news in mesothelioma. Read more about the trial here. Dr. Simone treats patients with malignant pleural mesothelioma with photon and proton radiation therapy and photodynamic therapy (PDT). He is a National Institutes of Health and Department of Defense funded investigator who performs clinical and translational research investigating the novel use of proton therapy and PDT as definitive therapy and as part of multi-modality therapy for mesothelioma.

As part of the Meet the Mesothelioma Experts series, the Meso Foundation invites specialists in the field of mesothelioma to discuss their current research interests as well as promising developments in the treatment of mesothelioma.

You can listen to this interview and other previous Meet the Mesothelioma Experts sessions at curemeso.org/experts.

Study Shows Bevacizumab Improves Survival in Mesothelioma

VaccineA Phase 3 French study, which will be presented at the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO)’s annual meeting at the end of May, demonstrated improved survival rates for those patients who received bevacizumab in addition to the current standard chemotherapy regimen of pemetrexed/cisplatin. Bevacizumab (Avastin® Genentech, Inc.) is an antibody that blocks angiogenesis (blood vessel growth), and it is already routinely used to treat many other cancers, including lung cancer and colon cancer.

“The mesothelioma community has been waiting for this kind of news for a long time—it is the first positive phase III trial in mesothelioma since the original study of pemetrexed/cisplatin over 10 years ago,” said Dr. Lee M. Krug of Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center and chair of the board of directors of the Mesothelioma Applied Research Foundation.

“The addition of bevacizumab has the potential to become a new standard of care for first-line therapy in this disease,” he added.

The study, conducted between 2008 and 2014, included 448 patients treated in 73 centers. The patients were randomized into two arms– one received standard chemotherapy (pemetrexed and cisplatin) and the other received standard chemotherapy plus bevacizumab. Overall survival was significantly longer in the experimental arm (median: 18.8 months vs. 16.1 months). The study concluded that adding bevacizumab in addition to pemetrexed/cisplatin provides a significantly longer survival in patients with malignant pleural mesothelioma, with acceptable toxicity, making this triplet a new treatment paradigm.

Meet the Mesothelioma Experts: Drs. Alley and Simone of Penn Medicine

Penn MedicineOn Thursday, May 14 at 8PM ET, the Meso Foundation will interview Drs. Evan Alley and Charles Simone of Penn Medicine during a new installment of the Meet the Mesothelioma Experts live teleconference series. The interview will be led by the Meso Foundation’s executive director and expert mesothelioma nurse practitioner Mary Hesdorffer.

This session, titled Focus on Mesothelioma Centers of Excellence: Penn Medicine, is the second installment in a series of interviews highlighting mesothelioma centers of excellence.

The session will be available live on Thursday, May 14 at 8PM ET by dialing into the conference call. The session is available at no charge, but those interested in participating must RSVP ahead of time in order to receive the call-in number. Please RSVP at curemeso.org/experts.

RSVP

Drs. Alley and Simone are the co-directors of the Penn Mesothelioma and Pleural Program. Dr. Alley is a medical oncologist and is the leading investigator in the PD-1 inhibitor trial that has recently made big news in mesothelioma. Read more about the trial here.

Dr. Simone treats patients with malignant pleural mesothelioma with photon and proton radiation therapy and photodynamic therapy (PDT). He is a National Institutes of Health and Department of Defense funded investigator who performs clinical and translational research investigating the novel use of proton therapy and PDT as definitive therapy and as part of multi-modality therapy for mesothelioma.

To RSVP to this session and learn more about the Meet the Mesothelioma Experts series, visit curemeso.org/experts.

Examining Current Clinical Trials and Mesothelioma Treatment Trends

Watch Mary Hesdorffer, the Meso Foundation’s executive director and mesothelioma expert, in this opening presentation at the 2015 International Symposium on Malignant Mesothelioma. In this video, she discusses the state of mesothelioma research and treatment options. Her discussion begins with a focus on clinical trials. With 92 open clinical trials for mesothelioma, of which 55 include some form of pharmacologic or radiotherapy intervention, mesothelioma research has never looked more hopeful.

Currently, research is focusing beyond chemotherapy, taking a look at how manipulation of the immune system can advance treatment options. SS1P, an immunotoxin, illustrates this new area of research. Other trials are looking at modulating the immune system with t-cells in hopes of starting immune system surveillance that will destroy the bad cells.

Available clinical trials now include vaccine treatments, chemotherapy, and, sometimes, a combination of both. For example, the CRS-207 trial combines a mesothelin-targeting vaccine with traditional chemotherapy.

Various new trials are also in the works. Verastem, a pharmaceutical company, is beginning a trial that uses an agent to target cancer stem cells to delay the time to progression after having a response or stabilization with first-line therapy.

Another focus in mesothelioma research is targeting angiogenesis. Angiogenesis is the ability for cancer cells to find new blood supplies so they can continue growing. This type of research is working on ways to cut off this blood supply.

Mary notes that the face of cancer treatment is changing, and it is important that patients are healthy enough to receive new treatments. When considering a new clinical trial or treatment, a patient must consider the impact it can have on their health, how it will impact their cancer, and whether or not the new drugs will prevent them from being able to try other treatments in the future.

To watch Mary Hesdorffer’s full presentation, click here.

Preliminary Results of Immunotherapy Drug Show Promise for Mesothelioma Patients

VaccineThe Meso Foundation is optimistic about the results of the Phase 1b trial of pembrolizumab for PD-L1-positive advanced solid tumors, which were announced at the most recent meeting of the American Association for Cancer Research (AACR).

Dr. Evan W. Alley, MD, PhD, co-director of the Penn Mesothelioma and Pleural Program, reported the results of a Phase 1b trial of pembrolizumab for PD-L1-positive advanced solid tumors at the AACR Annual Meeting on Sunday. Of the twenty-five patients with mesothelioma who were treated as part of the study, 28% experienced tumor shrinkage and another 48% had prolonged stabilization of their disease. The drug was also demonstrated to be safe, with no patients discontinuing treatment as a result of side-effects.

”These results are quite exciting, and provide further proof of principal that this class of drugs, known as checkpoint inhibitors, are effective for mesothelioma,” noted Dr. Lee M. Krug, Chair of the Board of Directors for the Meso Foundation. “Hopefully this study will encourage much larger trials in this disease.”

Pembolizumab is an antibody that blocks the inhibitory effects of PD-1, thereby boosting the immune system’s activity. In cancer, high tumor expression of PD-L1 is linked with more aggressive disease and a poorer prognosis, and PD-L1 expression was used to select patients for this study. PD-1 inhibitors have already shown great promise in melanoma, renal cell carcinoma and lung cancer, demonstrating both tumor shrinkage and durable responses. Pembrolizumab (KeytrudaTM) is FDA approved for the treatment of advanced melanoma.

In May, the Meso Foundation will be hosting Dr. Alley in an interview, as part of the Meet the Mesothelioma Experts series. More information about the series is available at curemeso.org/experts.