Importance of Dental Hygiene for Mesothelioma Patients

mouth_smallCancer therapies often result in xerostomia (dry mouth), a condition that can lead to increased risk of infection and cavities. Bacteria in the mouth are kept in check by saliva, which is a crucial fist line of defense in maintaining good oral health. When there isn’t enough saliva produced, or the amount available isn’t enough to clear infection-causing bacteria, it is possible to develop sores and excoriated tissue. Dry mouth is also a causative factor of malodorous breath and cavities, as food particles are not cleared away as quickly as they would be in a well-hydrated state.

Symptoms of dry mouth include stringy saliva, cracked or dry lips, difficulty speaking, and a burning sensation. When the mouth becomes too dry, chewing and swallowing are affected and may increase the risk of aspiration pneumonia, a life-threatening condition for at-risk cancer patients.

In mesothelioma patients, xerostomia is most often caused by chemotherapy, but lack of hydration and sometimes radiation can also be the culprits.

Xerostomia can be treated with medications to stimulate the production of saliva or with over-the-counter chewing gum and mouthwashes, depending on the severity.

Scheduling a dentist appointment before initiation of chemotherapy is a good practice to follow in order to identify and correct any dental conditions. Once chemotherapy has begun, patients should  brush 3 to 4 times daily, as vomiting and acid reflux are known to erode dental enamel. During this period, fluid intake should also be increased and gentle flossing should be continued. If platelets become low, patients should discontinue flossing until advised to resume.

It is important for mesothelioma patients to schedule regular dental check-ups. Because some dental interventions should not be performed when a patient is at a high risk for infection or bleeding, patients should inform their dentists if they are receiving chemotherapy treatments.

FROM THE HEADLINES: The Mesothelioma Applied Research Foundation Appears before the United States Senate Committee on Appropriations

Last week, on June 6, 2012, Mary Hesdorffer, MS, APRN, nurse practitioner and medical liaison for the Mesothelioma Applied Research Foundation, appeared before the United States Senate Committee on Appropriations – Subcommittee on Defense, at their Fiscal Year 2013 Appropriations Outside Witness Testimony Hearing. Speaking with the voice of the Meso Foundation and its community, Mary made an appeal to the lawmakers for their attention concerning mesothelioma and its impact on those who served to defend the United States.

The Meso Foundation played a critical role in making peritoneal mesothelioma and pleural mesothelioma eligible topics within the Congressionally Directed Medical Research Program. The first ever DoD award for mesothelioma occurred in 2008 when one investigator obtained over $1.3 million for research. A total of $7.7 million has been awarded to mesothelioma research through the Peer Reviewed Medical Research Program and the Peer Reviewed Cancer Research Program, both divisions of the Congressionally Directed Medical Research Program, which is administered by the Department of Defense since Fiscal Year 2008. Continue reading “FROM THE HEADLINES: The Mesothelioma Applied Research Foundation Appears before the United States Senate Committee on Appropriations” »

GUEST POST: An ASCO Update from Dr. Lee M. Krug, MD

The Meso Foundation is happy to present this special guest blogpost from Lee M. Krug, MD, Associate Attending Physician in the Division of Thoracic Oncology, Department of Medicine at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center in New York, New York and Director of the Mesothelioma Program at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center. Dr. Krug has investigated multimodality approaches for patients with early stage malignant pleural mesothelioma, has led a multicenter U.S. trial of induction chemotherapy before extrapleural pneumonectomy, and has a current study testing the feasibility of chemotherapy followed by pleural radiation. Dr. Krug also has a strong interest in novel therapeutics for patients with more advanced disease, and is the principal investigator of an international, phase III trial of a histone deacetylase inhibitor, vorinostat. Dr. Krug led the committee for the National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) that established treatment guidelines for mesothelioma, and is currently the chairman of the Scientific Advisory Board and serves on the Board of Directors at the Meso Foundation.

The Annual Meeting of the American Society for Clinical Oncology (ASCO) was held in Chicago, IL from June 1-5, 2012. This is the largest meeting in oncology each year with over 25,000 attendees from all over the world. Several abstracts of interest to mesothelioma were presented, so I thought I would summarize the results of a few of the most interesting:

Randomized Phase II Trial of Pemetrexed/Cisplatin with or without CBP501 in Patients with Advanced Malignant Pleural Mesothelioma: CBP501 is a novel compound that enhances the ability of cisplatin to damage cancer cells. In this international trial, patients received treatment with standard chemotherapy (pemetrexed and cisplatin), or they received it in combination with CBP501. 63 patients participated in total; 40 were in the group with CBP501. The only additional side effect of CBP501 seemed to be a rash that occurred during the infusion. Forty percent of the patients who received chemotherapy plus CBP501 had tumor shrinkage as compared to 17% of the patients who received chemotherapy alone. The average time before the cancer grew back was 5.9 months in the CBP501 arm, and 4.7 months in the other arm. Although the patients who received chemotherapy alone fared less well than expected, the results seemed encouraging. Another similar trial with CBP501 has also been conducted in lung cancer and until those results become available later this year, plans for future trials are unclear. Continue reading “GUEST POST: An ASCO Update from Dr. Lee M. Krug, MD” »