Updates from ASCO: CRS-207 Vaccine Study Results

MicroscopeAduro BioTech is conducting a clinical trial to test an investigational new immunotherapy for malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM). This therapy, called CRS-207, is given to a patient in combination with chemotherapy in hopes of encouraging the body’s normal defense mechanisms to fight off the cancer. This trial aims to enroll up to 60 patients at 5 U.S. clinical sites. The company presented data at the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) conference this week showing that of the 32 patients with MPM treated with CRS-207 and chemotherapy, MPM tumors reduced in size for 19 patients, and tumors remained the same size (stable) in an additional 11 patients. CRS-207 is given prior to and after chemotherapy (cyclophosphamide, pemetrexed and cisplatin) for patients who have not received prior treatment or surgery for their disease.

If you are interested in participating in a clinical trial for this investigational new therapy, please click here.

The 2015 ASCO Annual Meeting, one of the largest oncology meetings of the year, was held from May 29 to June 2 in Chicago, Illinois. The Meso Foundation will be providing more information on studies presented at ASCO in the coming weeks.

LISTEN: Meet the Mesothelioma Experts Interview with Drs. Simone and Alley Now Available

Penn MedicineOn Thursday, May 14, the Meso Foundation interviewed Dr. Charles Simone and Dr. Evan Alley of the University of Pennsylvania Medicine during the Meet the Mesothelioma Experts series. The session was part of a series of interviews focusing on mesothelioma centers of excellence. Drs. Simone and Alley were interviewed by the Meso Foundation’s executive director, Mary Hesdorffer, with whom they discussed the mesothelioma program at the University of Pennsylvania Medicine.

The full interview is now available on demand on the Meso Foundation’s website at curemeso.org/experts.

Drs. Alley and Simone are the co-directors of the Penn Mesothelioma and Pleural Program. Dr. Alley is a medical oncologist and is the leading investigator in the PD-1 inhibitor trial that has recently made big news in mesothelioma. Read more about the trial here. Dr. Simone treats patients with malignant pleural mesothelioma with photon and proton radiation therapy and photodynamic therapy (PDT). He is a National Institutes of Health and Department of Defense funded investigator who performs clinical and translational research investigating the novel use of proton therapy and PDT as definitive therapy and as part of multi-modality therapy for mesothelioma.

As part of the Meet the Mesothelioma Experts series, the Meso Foundation invites specialists in the field of mesothelioma to discuss their current research interests as well as promising developments in the treatment of mesothelioma.

You can listen to this interview and other previous Meet the Mesothelioma Experts sessions at curemeso.org/experts.

Meet the Mesothelioma Experts: Drs. Alley and Simone of Penn Medicine

Penn MedicineOn Thursday, May 14 at 8PM ET, the Meso Foundation will interview Drs. Evan Alley and Charles Simone of Penn Medicine during a new installment of the Meet the Mesothelioma Experts live teleconference series. The interview will be led by the Meso Foundation’s executive director and expert mesothelioma nurse practitioner Mary Hesdorffer.

This session, titled Focus on Mesothelioma Centers of Excellence: Penn Medicine, is the second installment in a series of interviews highlighting mesothelioma centers of excellence.

The session will be available live on Thursday, May 14 at 8PM ET by dialing into the conference call. The session is available at no charge, but those interested in participating must RSVP ahead of time in order to receive the call-in number. Please RSVP at curemeso.org/experts.

RSVP

Drs. Alley and Simone are the co-directors of the Penn Mesothelioma and Pleural Program. Dr. Alley is a medical oncologist and is the leading investigator in the PD-1 inhibitor trial that has recently made big news in mesothelioma. Read more about the trial here.

Dr. Simone treats patients with malignant pleural mesothelioma with photon and proton radiation therapy and photodynamic therapy (PDT). He is a National Institutes of Health and Department of Defense funded investigator who performs clinical and translational research investigating the novel use of proton therapy and PDT as definitive therapy and as part of multi-modality therapy for mesothelioma.

To RSVP to this session and learn more about the Meet the Mesothelioma Experts series, visit curemeso.org/experts.

Examining Current Clinical Trials and Mesothelioma Treatment Trends

Watch Mary Hesdorffer, the Meso Foundation’s executive director and mesothelioma expert, in this opening presentation at the 2015 International Symposium on Malignant Mesothelioma. In this video, she discusses the state of mesothelioma research and treatment options. Her discussion begins with a focus on clinical trials. With 92 open clinical trials for mesothelioma, of which 55 include some form of pharmacologic or radiotherapy intervention, mesothelioma research has never looked more hopeful.

Currently, research is focusing beyond chemotherapy, taking a look at how manipulation of the immune system can advance treatment options. SS1P, an immunotoxin, illustrates this new area of research. Other trials are looking at modulating the immune system with t-cells in hopes of starting immune system surveillance that will destroy the bad cells.

Available clinical trials now include vaccine treatments, chemotherapy, and, sometimes, a combination of both. For example, the CRS-207 trial combines a mesothelin-targeting vaccine with traditional chemotherapy.

Various new trials are also in the works. Verastem, a pharmaceutical company, is beginning a trial that uses an agent to target cancer stem cells to delay the time to progression after having a response or stabilization with first-line therapy.

Another focus in mesothelioma research is targeting angiogenesis. Angiogenesis is the ability for cancer cells to find new blood supplies so they can continue growing. This type of research is working on ways to cut off this blood supply.

Mary notes that the face of cancer treatment is changing, and it is important that patients are healthy enough to receive new treatments. When considering a new clinical trial or treatment, a patient must consider the impact it can have on their health, how it will impact their cancer, and whether or not the new drugs will prevent them from being able to try other treatments in the future.

To watch Mary Hesdorffer’s full presentation, click here.

Mesothelioma Researcher Receives Prestigious Grant from Department of Defense

Marjorie ZaudererMarjorie Zauderer, MD, is a medical oncologist at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center specializing in the care of lung cancer and mesothelioma patients, and serves as a member of the Meso Foundation’s Science Advisory Board. Recently, Dr. Zauderer was granted the Career Development Award to fund her mesothelioma research project.

Dr. Zauderer received the Career Development Award for her current research project involving the role of the BAP 1 gene (BRCA associated protein-1) in mesothelioma. Inherited mutations in the BAP1 gene have been shown to predispose patients to malignant pleural mesothelioma. “A better understanding of this gene could mean a better understanding of mesothelioma and how it develops in patients,” Zauderer states.

Dr. Zauderer began working on this project three years ago and has been gathering specimens and samples throughout this time. She predicts that enough samples will be collected within the next year or two to begin analysis that could yield significant insights and statistics. Her goal in 3 to 5 years is to have a plausible drug that has already completed phase 1 testing or is ready to begin phase 1 testing in clinical trials.

In an interview, Dr. Zauderer expressed her passion for her work, citing her many college application essays that she recently came across. “All my applications were about how I wanted to use genetics to help medicine. 20 years later, that’s actually what I do,” Zauderer states.

The Career Development Award provides funding from the Department of Defense to support a specific research project. Funding is provided to the selected project over a three year period, during which certain research components must be met and specific goals achieved. Mesothelioma is a disease of interest to the Department of Defense, as an estimated one third of mesothelioma patients either served in the Navy or worked in shipyards.

Learn more about Marjorie Zauderer at curemeso.org.