Symposium Videos, Photos Now Available!

2014 Symposium Photos

In early March, the Meso Foundation held its 11th International Symposium on Malignant Mesothelioma in Alexandria, Virginia. We welcomed attendees from all over the world, including patients, caregivers, doctors, researchers, and so many others. The event was a huge success.

WEDNESDAY
Wednesday morning began as attendees gathered for breakfast before heading off to Capitol Hill for Advocacy Day. This is the time when the entire meso community welcomes the opportunity to educate our law-makers about mesothelioma and the need for mesothelioma research funding. This video gives a brief overview of the day.

Wednesday night concluded with a Welcome Reception for all attendees. The reception began with a keynote speech from Dr. Dean Fennel and then moved on to a night of passed hors d’oeurve, drinks, and socializing with the community. This was the first of many chances for attendees to mingle with old friends and make new ones. Take a look at some photos from the event!

THURSDAY
Thursday morning began with a Celebration of Life ceremony, which culminated in a release of doves over the pond outside the hotel. The theme of the ceremony was hope, compassion, and community.

Dove release

Doves were released during the Celebration of Life at the Symposium

The Foundation’s executive director, Mary Hesdorffer, NP, kicked off the day of sessions with a welcome speech in which she introduced the Meso Foundation’s staff, Board of Directors, and Science Advisory Board. We then heard from two keynote speakers: Dr. Ira Pastan, Head of the Molecular Biology Section of the National Cancer Institute, followed by Dr. Raffit Hassan.

Meso community

Every year, the community loves to get together at the Symposium. They find time to socialize even with a tight agenda!

Thursday continued with informative scientific and community sessions, started by Dr. Faris Farassati who discussed cancer stem cells. Mary was then joined by Dr. Marc DePerrot, Dr. Dan Miller, and Dr. James Pingpank to discuss post-surgical recovery. Dr. Tobias Peikert and Dr. Dan Sterman covered the topic of pulmonary health. In nonmedical sessions, Olga Pavlick led a newly bereaved discussion group, while Jessica Barker was joined by Rich Mosca and Hanne Mintz to discuss the importance of getting a proclamation in your area to officially declare September 26th as Mesothelioma Awareness Day. Miriam Ratner, Rev. Eric Linthicum, and Dana Purcell held a panel discussing the healing arts. Other topics of the day included exercise and nutrition, novel therapeutics, radiation oncology, chemotherapy, and early detection.

Thursday night concluded with an Awards Dinner. The dinner was MCed by Dr. Joseph Friedberg and Dr. Dan Sterman of the University of Pennsylvania, who did a great job keeping the atmosphere light-hearted and fun. We hope they never quit their day jobs, but surely they could also make a career in comedy!

Congresswoman Pingree

Congresswoman Pingree (center) with her constituent Lisa Gonneville (right) and Mary Hesdorffer, NP (left)

We were honored to have Congresswoman Chellie Pingree in attendance to accept the Bruce Vento Hope Builder Award, and she gave a powerful speech about her dedication to our cause and the need for mesothelioma research funding.

AWARDS
Rev. Eric Linthicum was presented the Compassion Award for his caring nature and dedication to the Foundation’s community. Dr. Michele Carbone received the Pioneer Award for his advancements in mesothelioma research. The Klaus Brauch Volunteer of the Year Award was presented to Olga Pavlick and Sarah Pavlick for their incredible efforts in organizing fundraising events and volunteering with the Meso Foundation. Anne Alessandrini received the June Breit and Jocelyn Farrar Outstanding Nurse Award for her passionate work in the Thoracic ICU at Brigham and Women’s Hospital. Jocelyn Farrar’s daughter presented the award to Anne. We also had a surprise award, the Philanthropy Award, which we presented to Don Bendix for his financial dedication to the Meso Foundation and mesothelioma research funding.

FRIDAY
Friday morning, the community was up bright and early for another day of sessions. The day began with a translation of the Scientific Seminar from Dr. H. Richard Alexander. He was then joined by Dr. Lee Krug to discuss the current state of mesothelioma research. Friday was not all about science, however, as we also held sessions such as yoga, walking for health, and art therapy. Following a brief update on the state of the Meso Foundation, Melinda Kotzian moderated a panel about getting involved and how you can help the Foundation. We heard from Maja Belamaric, Dana Purcell, Bonnie Anderson, Erica Ruble, Marina Mintz, and Rich Mosca on the many, many ways to get involved – from simply telling your story to events and advocacy. Other sessions of the day included a legislative update with Jessica Barker, a session with the American Legion, a talk on the empowered patient from Mary Hesdorffer, a session on chemo brain, a session on how to host a fundraising event as well as a fundraising panel, and more.

Meso Fighters Band

The Meso Fighters Band took the stage at the Community Dinner

Friday night served as a celebration wrapping up another successful Symposium. The Community Dinner was more like a community party than anything else. After an excellent buffet, attendees were surprised with a choreographed dance from Melinda Kotzian and Mary Hesdorffer (don’t worry – we have a video!). Following suit, much of the community took to the dance floor as the Meso Fighters Band took the stage. The Meso Fighters Band, which is made up of patients, doctors, and bereaved, played multiple sets featuring a playlist that mixed rock and pop. We heard everything from Janis Joplin to Katy Perry, and it was all fantastic. We ended the Meso Foundation’s 11th International Symposium on Malignant Mesothelioma with a celebration of our incredible community.

TAKE A LOOK
We have released videos of many sessions and speeches from the event. Watch the videos on our YouTube channel.

You can also check out some photos from the Symposium!

GUEST BLOG: Krisha Deaver and Why She Needs the Symposium

Krisha and Cam Deaverby Krisha Deaver

I’ll be honest: I wasn’t sure I wanted to go to the Symposium last year. I knew I needed to go, but that’s not the same thing.

I needed to go because information is power when fighting an elusive enemy like mesothelioma.

I needed to go because fighting cancer is lonely, and I wanted to meet people who understood.

I needed to go because my husband, Cam, is everything to me—and I’ll do whatever it takes to help him beat this disease.

But all the same, I wasn’t exactly looking forward to it. In hindsight, I can recognize my hesitation for what it was: fear.

I was afraid it would be sad. I was particularly worried about a session that recognized those who had passed away during the year. I couldn’t face that — I was terrified of losing Cam. So guess what I did? I gave myself permission not to attend that session. And that was a fine approach because it was what I needed to do at the time.

I was afraid that the Symposium would be too much for me emotionally — three full days of staring into the face of meso. That fear seems laughable now. After all, hadn’t I been consumed for months doing exactly that? Through research, doctor visits, tests, and surgery, I’d been relentlessly staring down the beast.

Rather than being overwhelming, the Symposium was a tremendous relief. Admittedly, there was a lot of information and new faces and ideas to take in, but I ultimately found myself surrounded by people equally passionate about finding answers to this disease.

It was a relief to hear researchers present their findings. Even if I didn’t follow all the science, I understood enough, and I was grateful that the researchers could see my pleading eyes in the audience. I’m glad that I sat next to my husband, squeezing his hand, and helped to put a face to the need for more research.

It was a relief to attend the session for caregivers and hear from a panel that helped me feel connected. It was a relief to ask my toughest questions to that group and gain their wisdom and support.

It was a relief to approach a brilliant researcher after her presentation and ask a follow-up question specific to Cam’s recovery. I was able to pick the brains of every other doctor I could catch.

It was a relief to hear from dedicated and passionate fundraisers and learn how I can help contribute to the effort to find a cure.

As the Symposium was winding down, it was a wonderful relief to attend the closing celebration. At this annual dinner, I listened to Cam optimistically talk about his journey and perspective, and it was one of the proudest moments of my life.

In the year since the Symposium, when I feel fear creeping in, one of the things that keeps me grounded is remembering the network of support I built by attending. Even though Cam and I were part of the Meso Foundation’s online community prior to the Symposium, nothing can compare to actually meeting others who “get it.”

At this year’s Symposium, I can’t wait for a fresh infusion of information, friends, and hope. Fear doesn’t stand a chance.

Dr. Ira Pastan of National Cancer Institute to Speak at Mesothelioma Symposium

Dr. Ira PastanThe Mesothelioma Applied Research Foundation announced that Dr. Ira Pastan, the Head of the National Cancer Institute’s Molecular Biology Section, will be the keynote speaker during its 11th annual International Symposium on Malignant Mesothelioma, taking place on March 5-7 in the Washington, DC metro area.

Alexandria, VA (PRWEB) February 28, 2014

The Mesothelioma Applied Research Foundation announced that Dr. Ira Pastan, the Head of the National Cancer Institute’s Molecular Biology Section, will be the keynote speaker during its 11th annual International Symposium on Malignant Mesothelioma, taking place on March 5-7 in the Washington, DC metro area.

Dr. Pastan is a world-renowned scientist known for his work in cancer research. Along with colleague Mark Willingham, he discovered mesothelin, a protein that is over-expressed in mesothelioma, as well as certain other cancers. This discovery has made it possible to develop an immunotoxin, SS1P, which targets the mesothelin antigen. SS1P has shown much promise in clinical trials by producing major tumor regressions lasting up to two years.

“It is an honor to have Dr. Pastan, one of those most imminent cancer researchers in this nation, joining us at our International Symposium on Malignant Mesothelioma,” said Mary Hesdorffer, NP, the executive director of the Mesothelioma Applied Research Foundation.

“Hearing about his promising work directly from Dr. Pastan will be a very inspiring experience for the mesothelioma patients in attendance, as well as others interested in curing mesothelioma,” she added.

Dr. Pastan will speak to the Symposium audience on Thursday, March 6 at 9:15 AM. The program will also be broadcast live on the web at http://www.curemeso.org/symposium.

Mesothelioma is a malignant tumor of the lining of the lung, abdomen, or heart known to be caused by exposure to asbestos. Medical experts consider it one of the most aggressive and deadly of all cancers. Approximately 3,500 Americans are diagnosed with mesothelioma every year and an estimated one-third were exposed while serving in the Navy or working in shipyards.

ABOUT THE MESOTHELIOMA APPLIED RESEARCH FOUNDATION
The Meso Foundation is the only 501(c)3 non-profit organization dedicated to eradicating mesothelioma and easing the suffering caused by this cancer. The Meso Foundation actively seeks philanthropic support to fund peer-reviewed mesothelioma research; provide patient support services and education; and advocate Congress for increased federal funding for mesothelioma research. The Meso Foundation is the only non-government funder of peer reviewed scientific research to establish effective treatments for mesothelioma and, ultimately, a cure for this extremely aggressive cancer. To date, the Foundation has awarded over $8.7 million to research. More information is available at http://www.curemeso.org.

Rep. Betty McCollum and Rep. Chellie Pingree to Receive Bruce Vento Hope-Builder Award

Congressional Briefing on Malignant MesotheliomaThe Mesothelioma Applied Research Foundation (Meso Foundation) announced that Congresswomen Betty McCollum and Chellie Pingree are the recipients of the Bruce Vento Hope-Builder Award, for sending a letter to Dr. Harold Varmus, Director of the National Cancer Institute, to urge the National Cancer Institute to further mesothelioma research.

Alexandria, VA (PRWEB) February 28, 2014

The Mesothelioma Applied Research Foundation (Meso Foundation) announced that Congresswomen Betty McCollum and Chellie Pingree are the recipients of the Bruce Vento Hope-Builder Award, for sending a letter to Dr. Harold Varmus, Director of the National Cancer Institute, to urge the National Cancer Institute to further mesothelioma research. They will be presented with the award during the International Symposium on Malignant Mesothelioma, on March 6.

Last month, U.S. Congresswomen Betty McCollum (D-MN) and Chellie Pingree (D-ME) sent a “Dear Colleague” letter to all members of the U.S. House of Representatives asking them to join them in urging the National Cancer Institute to create a scientific framework for mesothelioma. The Mesothelioma Applied Research Foundation (Meso Foundation) has long advocated for the National Cancer Institute to increase their focus on mesothelioma, and congratulates Representative McCollum and Representative Pingree for their efforts on behalf of the mesothelioma community, including patients and families, physicians, advocates, and researchers dedicated to eradicating the life-ending and vicious effects of mesothelioma.

The idea for this letter began when Representative Pingree’s constituent, mesothelioma survivor Lisa Gonneville spoke at the Capitol Hill briefing onMesothelioma Awareness Day (September 26).

Mrs. Gonneville, a mother of four and Dayton, ME resident, pleaded that the staffers do something to address this deadly cancer. “I’ve endured all of the treatment options available for mesothelioma, which are very limited,” said Mrs. Gonneville, “my only hope at this point is clinical trials.” Congresswoman Pingree was so moved by Ms. Gonneville’s story that she, too, wanted to help the mesothelioma community in her honor.

“Congresswomen McCollum and Pingree are leading a very important effort for everyone affected by mesothelioma by encouraging the National Cancer Institute to create a scientific framework to progress mesothelioma research,” said Meso Foundation’s executive director and nurse practitioner, Mary Hesdorffer.

“This is an incredible way to help thousands of patients affected by mesothelioma, and also honor our distinguished former board member and Congresswoman McCollum’s predecessor, Bruce Vento.”

Bruce Vento was a prominent member of Congress who, after nearly 24 years of service, succumbed to mesothelioma only eight months after diagnosis.

The Recalcitrant Cancer Research Act of 2012 was signed into law by President Obama on January 2, 2013 as part of the National Defense Authorization Act (Public Law No. 112-239), giving the Director of the National Cancer Institute (NCI) the ability to identify recalcitrant cancers for which to establish scientific frameworks that will guide research efforts.

For each recalcitrant cancer, NCI is to convene a working group of both Federal and non-Federal individuals to provide expertise and assistance in developing the scientific framework. The frameworks are to be completed within 18 months of enactment, then submitted to Congress and made publicly available on the HHS website within 30 days. The bill requires the progress of each scientific framework be reported in the National Institutes of Health (NIH) Biennial Report, with an assessment of progress made in improving outcomes for recalcitrant cancers. The bill further states that the NCI Director “shall consider” each relevant scientific framework when making recommendations for exception funding for grant applications.

Mesothelioma is a malignant tumor of the lining of the lung, abdomen, or heart known to be caused by exposure to asbestos. Medical experts consider it one of the most aggressive and deadly of all cancers. Approximately 3,500 Americans are diagnosed with mesothelioma every year and an estimated one-third were exposed while serving in the Navy or working in shipyards.

ABOUT THE MESOTHELIOMA APPLIED RESEARCH FOUNDATION
The Meso Foundation is the only 501(c)3 non-profit organization dedicated to eradicating mesothelioma and easing the suffering caused by this cancer. The Meso Foundation actively seeks philanthropic support to fund peer-reviewed mesothelioma research; provide patient support services and education; and advocate Congress for increased federal funding for mesothelioma research. The Meso Foundation is the only non-government funder of peer reviewed scientific research to establish effective treatments for mesothelioma and, ultimately, a cure for this extremely aggressive cancer. To date, the Foundation has awarded over $8.7 million to research. More information is available at http://www.curemeso.org.

Live Broadcast of Mesothelioma Conference for Patients and Family Members

International Symposium on Malignant MesotheliomaThe Mesothelioma Applied Research Foundation will provide an online live broadcast of its annual International Symposium on Malignant Mesothelioma on March 6-7

Alexandria, VA (PRWEB) February 27, 2014

On March 6-7, the Mesothelioma Applied Research Foundation (Meso Foundation) will make available a free-of-charge live broadcast of its 11th International Symposium on Malignant Mesothelioma. The Symposium is a unique event that covers important treatment information and research advances presented by mesothelioma experts. The Meso Foundation understands that many mesothelioma patients are unable to travel for health reasons, so to ensure the community can still access this life-saving information, live video coverage of most session will be available through the Meso Foundation’s website.

The free live stream is a real-time broadcast of the Thursday and Friday sessions of the Symposium. Only a computer (or smart phone/device) and an internet connection are needed to access the live stream, which will be available athttp://www.curemeso.org/symposium. The same webpage also contains the full agenda of the event.

Some of the topics covered during the Symposium and its live stream include pleural and peritoneal mesothelioma, immunotherapy, post-surgical recovery, early detection, novel therapeutics, radiation oncology, chemotherapy: poison or antidote?, chemo brain, survivorship, nutrition, exercise, caregiver conversations, healing from loss of a loved one, getting involved, and an update on the work of the Meso Foundation.

The Symposium is geared to attendees from all walks of life, including patients and their families, advocates, medical professionals, and those who have lost a loved one to mesothelioma. The Symposium will be held from March 5-7 at the Hilton Alexandria Mark Center in Alexandria Virginia. Symposium events will include an advocacy day on Capitol Hill, science and community sessions, a Celebration of Life ceremony, an Awards Dinner, a Community Dinner featuring the Meso Fighters Band, and more. A full list of events, topics, and speakers can be found at http://www.curemeso.org/symposium.

Mesothelioma is a malignant tumor of the lining of the lung, abdomen, or heart known to be caused by exposure to asbestos. Medical experts consider it one of the most aggressive and deadly of all cancers. Approximately 3,500 Americans are diagnosed with mesothelioma every year and an estimated one-third were exposed while serving in the Navy or working in shipyards.

ABOUT THE MESOTHELIOMA APPLIED RESEARCH FOUNDATION
The Meso Foundation is the only 501(c)3 non-profit organization dedicated to eradicating mesothelioma and easing the suffering caused by this cancer. The Meso Foundation actively seeks philanthropic support to fund peer-reviewed mesothelioma research; provide patient support services and education; and advocate Congress for increased federal funding for mesothelioma research. The Meso Foundation is the only non-government funder of peer reviewed scientific research to establish effective treatments for mesothelioma and, ultimately, a cure for this extremely aggressive cancer. To date, the Foundation has awarded over $8.7 million to research. More information is available at http://www.curemeso.org.