Have You Been Seeing Fewer Posts from the Meso Foundation in your Facebook Feed?

Meso Facebook LikeIn recent years, social media has become a valuable tool used to assist nonprofit organizations in raising awareness of their cause and programs. The Meso Foundation has been taking advantage of a number of platforms for this purpose, and is currently present on Facebook, Twitter, and YouTube. We use these social networks to connect with our community, provide news and information, promote upcoming events, fundraise, and simply to discuss mesothelioma and raise awareness of this cancer. We have found that Facebook, in particular, is an ideal social media tool for our purposes, and we have been using it extensively.

However, as a business, Facebook is focused on making money.  Recently, in an effort to do just that, Facebook engineers have made changes to the way posts are displayed on your news feed. Just a few months ago, those of you following our Facebook page would see our posts regularly. Now, however, Facebook shows our posts to only about 10% of you. The goal for Facebook is to increase the amount of money they make from organizations using paid advertisements. As a nonprofit organization, we don’t have the luxury of spending much money to promote information that should be accessible to you for free, and for this reason, we need your help!

In order to give our posts more visibility, Facebook wants to see first that our content is interesting. This is gauged by the number of likes, comments, and shares a post receives. So here’s how you can help out:

  • Interact with us! If you see a post that interests you, click “like” and leave us a comment.
  • If you think your own network of friends will like the post, share it.

Not only will this allow us to hear your thoughts and opinions, but it will give our content more play by telling Facebook that our posts should be released to more of our followers. The more you interact with our posts, the more people will see them.

To break it down, here’s an example: The Meso Foundation posts an article from our blog on Facebook, and it is seen by about 200 people. If each of those 200 people like, share, or comment on the post, it will be seen by the friends of each person! This gives our content a much larger reach, and in turn, gets the word out about mesothelioma.

Through social media, we are given the opportunity to directly connect with our community members. We want to hear your questions, comments, concerns, and thoughts on the content we post. Even if you have nothing to say, a simple like or share will go a long way in getting our content out there to more people. Through these efforts, we hope to raise mesothelioma awareness while building an online community dedicated to the mission of developing effective treatment and a cure for mesothelioma patients.

If you haven’t already, be sure to like the Meso Foundation on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

New Therapeutic Approaches for Malignant Mesothelioma Using Immunotherapy to Target WT1

Slide for MARF-3-19-2014by Tao Dao, Lee M. Krug and David A. Scheinberg, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY

Wilms’ tumor  1 (WT1) is a protein that is present at high levels in many types of cancers (especially mesothelioma), but it is generally not found in normal cells. Therefore, we think that it is a potential target for novel therapies, and particularly immunotherapies. WT1 is typically found inside the cell, in the nucleus. Only after it is processed and moved to the surface of the cancer is it possible for the immune system to see it. We think that if we could teach the immune system to attack WT1, we could find an effective way to specifically kill mesothelioma cancer cells.

At Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, we are studying two ways to boost the immune response against WT1. The first is with a vaccine. Normally, the WT1 protein does not cause an immune response to occur. However, we found that small pieces of WT1 proteins that are just slightly different from normal WT1 protein can stimulate the immune system better. If we can teach the patient’s immune system to target WT1 using a vaccine made up of these protein pieces, then perhaps it will also learn to attack the cancer cells. In fact, when we gave the WT1 vaccine to patients along with some immune booster medicines, they developed an excellent immune response specifically to WT1. We are now studying this vaccine in a larger clinical trial to see if it is effective against the cancer. Patients who have undergone surgery for mesothelioma either get the immune boosters alone or together with the WT1 vaccine to see if it can prolong the time before the mesothelioma grows back.

We are now also studying another way to attack WT1 using antibodies. Antibodies are proteins in the body that stick to foreign substances (such as bacteria or viruses) and tag them for destruction by the immune system. In this case, however, we have engineered antibodies in a laboratory so they will recognize WT1. Thus, instead of the vaccine strategy which relies on teaching the patient’s immune system to attack WT1, these antibodies can be injected and bind directly to it. We have demonstrated that this antibody is a potent therapeutic agent against human mesothelioma in animal models. Our study was published in the Science Translational Medicine in March, 2013. (http://stm.sciencemag.org/content/5/176/176ra33.long). We are working to bring this promising new drug to clinical application in the very near future.

Acknowledgement

We greatly appreciate the grant support from the Mesothelioma Applied Research Foundation for our exciting research targeting WT1 by both vaccines and antibody therapies (TD and LMK are recipients of Meso Foundation grants).

The 2014 Symposium Has Begun!

Advocates for Mesothelioma are gathered for the 2014 International Symposium on Malignant Mesothelioma

The 2014 Meso Foundation’s International Symposium on Malignant Mesothelioma began yesterday in Washington, DC. Yesterday, attendees spent the day on Capitol Hill advocating for federal involvement in mesothelioma research.

Today, March 6, attendees have been listening to a variety of speakers and have been learning about topics such as cancer stem cells, pleural and peritoneal mesothelioma, novel therapeutics, chemotherapy, early detection, etc…

The Symposium is also available via live stream to those unable to travel. Click here to learn more about the symposium and watch the live stream

GUEST BLOG: Krisha Deaver and Why She Needs the Symposium

Krisha and Cam Deaverby Krisha Deaver

I’ll be honest: I wasn’t sure I wanted to go to the Symposium last year. I knew I needed to go, but that’s not the same thing.

I needed to go because information is power when fighting an elusive enemy like mesothelioma.

I needed to go because fighting cancer is lonely, and I wanted to meet people who understood.

I needed to go because my husband, Cam, is everything to me—and I’ll do whatever it takes to help him beat this disease.

But all the same, I wasn’t exactly looking forward to it. In hindsight, I can recognize my hesitation for what it was: fear.

I was afraid it would be sad. I was particularly worried about a session that recognized those who had passed away during the year. I couldn’t face that — I was terrified of losing Cam. So guess what I did? I gave myself permission not to attend that session. And that was a fine approach because it was what I needed to do at the time.

I was afraid that the Symposium would be too much for me emotionally — three full days of staring into the face of meso. That fear seems laughable now. After all, hadn’t I been consumed for months doing exactly that? Through research, doctor visits, tests, and surgery, I’d been relentlessly staring down the beast.

Rather than being overwhelming, the Symposium was a tremendous relief. Admittedly, there was a lot of information and new faces and ideas to take in, but I ultimately found myself surrounded by people equally passionate about finding answers to this disease.

It was a relief to hear researchers present their findings. Even if I didn’t follow all the science, I understood enough, and I was grateful that the researchers could see my pleading eyes in the audience. I’m glad that I sat next to my husband, squeezing his hand, and helped to put a face to the need for more research.

It was a relief to attend the session for caregivers and hear from a panel that helped me feel connected. It was a relief to ask my toughest questions to that group and gain their wisdom and support.

It was a relief to approach a brilliant researcher after her presentation and ask a follow-up question specific to Cam’s recovery. I was able to pick the brains of every other doctor I could catch.

It was a relief to hear from dedicated and passionate fundraisers and learn how I can help contribute to the effort to find a cure.

As the Symposium was winding down, it was a wonderful relief to attend the closing celebration. At this annual dinner, I listened to Cam optimistically talk about his journey and perspective, and it was one of the proudest moments of my life.

In the year since the Symposium, when I feel fear creeping in, one of the things that keeps me grounded is remembering the network of support I built by attending. Even though Cam and I were part of the Meso Foundation’s online community prior to the Symposium, nothing can compare to actually meeting others who “get it.”

At this year’s Symposium, I can’t wait for a fresh infusion of information, friends, and hope. Fear doesn’t stand a chance.

Dr. Ira Pastan of National Cancer Institute to Speak at Mesothelioma Symposium

Dr. Ira PastanThe Mesothelioma Applied Research Foundation announced that Dr. Ira Pastan, the Head of the National Cancer Institute’s Molecular Biology Section, will be the keynote speaker during its 11th annual International Symposium on Malignant Mesothelioma, taking place on March 5-7 in the Washington, DC metro area.

Alexandria, VA (PRWEB) February 28, 2014

The Mesothelioma Applied Research Foundation announced that Dr. Ira Pastan, the Head of the National Cancer Institute’s Molecular Biology Section, will be the keynote speaker during its 11th annual International Symposium on Malignant Mesothelioma, taking place on March 5-7 in the Washington, DC metro area.

Dr. Pastan is a world-renowned scientist known for his work in cancer research. Along with colleague Mark Willingham, he discovered mesothelin, a protein that is over-expressed in mesothelioma, as well as certain other cancers. This discovery has made it possible to develop an immunotoxin, SS1P, which targets the mesothelin antigen. SS1P has shown much promise in clinical trials by producing major tumor regressions lasting up to two years.

“It is an honor to have Dr. Pastan, one of those most imminent cancer researchers in this nation, joining us at our International Symposium on Malignant Mesothelioma,” said Mary Hesdorffer, NP, the executive director of the Mesothelioma Applied Research Foundation.

“Hearing about his promising work directly from Dr. Pastan will be a very inspiring experience for the mesothelioma patients in attendance, as well as others interested in curing mesothelioma,” she added.

Dr. Pastan will speak to the Symposium audience on Thursday, March 6 at 9:15 AM. The program will also be broadcast live on the web at http://www.curemeso.org/symposium.

Mesothelioma is a malignant tumor of the lining of the lung, abdomen, or heart known to be caused by exposure to asbestos. Medical experts consider it one of the most aggressive and deadly of all cancers. Approximately 3,500 Americans are diagnosed with mesothelioma every year and an estimated one-third were exposed while serving in the Navy or working in shipyards.

ABOUT THE MESOTHELIOMA APPLIED RESEARCH FOUNDATION
The Meso Foundation is the only 501(c)3 non-profit organization dedicated to eradicating mesothelioma and easing the suffering caused by this cancer. The Meso Foundation actively seeks philanthropic support to fund peer-reviewed mesothelioma research; provide patient support services and education; and advocate Congress for increased federal funding for mesothelioma research. The Meso Foundation is the only non-government funder of peer reviewed scientific research to establish effective treatments for mesothelioma and, ultimately, a cure for this extremely aggressive cancer. To date, the Foundation has awarded over $8.7 million to research. More information is available at http://www.curemeso.org.