Hypnosis Therapy may Decrease Fatigue in Mesothelioma Patients

RelaxationIt was recently reported that a clinical trial that randomized patients to receive hypnosis and cognitive therapy had a statistically significant reduction in their fatigue levels as compared to 79 percent of patients who did not have this intervention. The sudy was led by Guy Montgomery, PhD, Director of the Integrative Behavioral Medicine Program at Mount Sinai Hospital in New York.

Two hundred breast cancer patients who were undergoing radiation therapy were eligible to participate in this study. It was unusual to find that six months after the completion of radiation therapy, the intervention group reported less fatigue than 95% of the control group (patients who did not receive hypnosis and cognitive therapy). Mesothelioma patients often receive radiation therapy following the completion of an extrapleural pneumonectomy (EPP) or a Pleurectomy Decortication (PD). Though there are no studies currently underway in mesothelioma, it seems reasonable that patients who will be undergoing surgery plus radiation should be put in touch with integrative medicine to ascertain what services might be available to them.

A few years back, we invited a hypnotherapist to conduct a workshop at the Meso Foundation’s Symposium to aid the community in banishing negative thoughts usually implanted during the initial diagnosis when they were informed of the disease and prematurely provided with a prognosis from a doctor unfamiliar with mesothelioma. A positive outlook certainly does not cure the disease, but patients who are positive tend to eat better, engage with others, and less often fall victim to depression, which could impact their ability to function.

The study, recently published in the Journal of Clinical Oncology (2014; doi:10.1200/JCO.2013.49.3437

Meet the Mesothelioma Experts: Defactinib, a New Investigational Agent for Mesothelioma

command1On April 8 at 9 PM Eastern time, the Mesothelioma Applied Research Foundation (Meso Foundation) will hold a new installment of its ‘Meet the Experts’ series, featuring Dr. Joanna C. Horobin, the Chief Medical Officer at Verastem, Inc., who will discuss the company’s latest investigational agent, defactinib, which is being developed for use in patients with pleural mesothelioma. Those interested in attending via telephone can RSVP by visiting http://www.curemeso.org/experts.

Dr. Horobin will be interviewed by Mary Hesdorffer, Meso Foundation’s executive director and experienced nurse practitioner. The goal of this “Meet the Experts” installment is to learn more about this novel agent, the purpose of which is to delay the time to progression after having a response or stabilization with first-line therapy. Currently, defactinib is available only through its clinical trial.

Dr. Horobin, M.B., Ch.B. has been the Chief Medical Officer at Verastem, Inc. since October 2012.

The Meet the Experts series is a live podcast created by the Meso Foundation with the goal of providing patients, their family members, and other interested parties with the most up-to-date information on mesothelioma treatment and research, directly from the physicians pioneering these advances. Past teleconferences have featured:

Dr. Lee Krug – Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center
Dr. Dan Sterman – University of Pennsylvania
Dr. Raffit Hassan – National Cancer Institute
Dr. Julie Brahmer – Johns Hopkins
Dr. Tobias Peikert – Mayo Clinic
Dr. Joseph Friedberg – University of Pennsylvania
Dr. Valerie Rusch – Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center
Melissa Culligan, RN – University of Pennsylvania

The topics, which have included immunotherapy, gene therapy, drugs, clinical trials, and biomarkers, are usually discussed through an informal interview, focusing on questions important to patients, in particular. Listeners are encouraged to ask questions while listening to the call.

New Discovery: Asbestos Used in Byzantine Art

Asbestos fiberWhen we think of asbestos today, we often think of shipyards, construction sites, the automotive industry, and many other places the material was used merely decades ago. However, asbestos has a much longer history. Recent findings reported by LiveScience are now linking asbestos use to Byzantine artwork.

A new discovery from UCLA researchers reveals that Byzantine monks used asbestos in the 12th century as a coating for plaster beneath wall paintings. They found chrysotile, also known as white asbestos, in Cyprus at Enkleistra of St. Neophytos, a Byzantine monastery. By using the white asbestos in the plaster coating, the artist achieved a desirable, smooth surface for painting on the wall.

Researchers were not looking for asbestos, but made this discovery while studying the painting. They now plan to conduct further research into other artwork at the monastery and revisit other sites in Cyprus to see if the asbestos use was consistent. They hope to understand why the asbestos was used in this fashion during the time period.

Asbestos use is actually quite ancient and can be dated back 4,500 years to a time when it was mixed with clay to reinforce pottery. It has also been found in textiles dated 2,000 years ago that were used to make fireproof napkins. Asbestos made a comeback as a popular material in late 19th century industrial products, and it was used in construction for decades.

Due to the historical use of asbestos and its natural occurrence in soil, a countless number of people have been exposed to these fibers. Asbestos is a known carcinogenic material, and exposure is linked to the development of diseases, including mesothelioma, one of the most aggressive and deadly cancers. The latency period between asbestos exposure and development of mesothelioma ranges between 20-50 years, meaning that patients today were exposed decades ago, and patients of tomorrow have likely already been exposed.

Approximately 3,500 Americans are diagnosed with mesothelioma every year, and there is currently no cure. The Meso Foundation is the only non-government funder of peer-reviewed scientific research focused on prevention, early detection, development of effective treatments, and, ultimately, a cure for mesothelioma. You can learn more about this cancer and the asbestos-mesothelioma link at curemeso.org.

Stay Tuned this Fall for Three Regional Conferences on Mesothelioma

conferenceFollowing the successful conclusion of its annual Symposium, the Mesothelioma Applied Research Foundation (Meso Foundation) announced that later this year it will be the host of three regional conferences in Philadelphia, Chicago, and San Francisco, for mesothelioma patients, their families, and others interested in learning about the most up-to-date information on mesothelioma treatment. In a cancer like mesothelioma, for which patients generally must travel far and often just to consult with experts, the ability to meet mesothelioma specialists, listen to their talks, and engage with them one-on-one, without leaving the conference venue, is unique , but also of utmost importance.

“Informed and knowledgeable patients generally can make better decisions regarding their treatment and care than those unaware of all options, side-effects, and other considerations,” said Mary Hesdorffer, experienced nurse practitioner and executive director of the Meso Foundation.

The three conferences, organized in conjunction with the University of Pennsylvania, University of Chicago, and the University of California San Francisco, are meant to provide patients across the country with similar, albeit condensed, benefits of the organization’s annual Symposium (expert presentations, support sessions, socialization with peers and experts), but with less travel and with only a one-day commitment.

The conferences will be scheduled as follows and more information will be made available a thttp://www.curemeso.org. The Foundation encourages everyone interested to sign up for its e-newsletter, through which it will make detailed conference information, including dates, available in the next few months.

September – at the University of Pennsylvania (Philadelphia)
October – at the University of Chicago (Chicago)
November – at the University of California San Francisco (San Francisco)

Asbestos Awareness Week: Counteracting Decades of Damage with Research?

AsbestosAwarenessWeek2014During the first week of April, the Mesothelioma Applied Research Foundation (Meso Foundation) will observe Asbestos Awareness Week while raising awareness of the deep damage inflicted by asbestos’ use and the overdue need for life-saving treatments and a cure for those who have already developed, or who will develop, mesothelioma. Mesothelioma is a cancer known to be caused by exposure to asbestos. The latency period between asbestos exposure and development of mesothelioma ranges between 20 – 50 years, meaning that patients of today were exposed decades ago, but also that patients of tomorrow have likely already been exposed.

Medical experts consider mesothelioma as one of the most aggressive and deadly of all cancers. With a 5-year survival rate in the single digits, mesothelioma currently has no cure. Approximately 3,500 Americans are diagnosed with mesothelioma every year and an estimated one-third were exposed while serving in the Navy or working in shipyards.

Asbestos, a catch-all term to describe a group of naturally-occurring mineral fibers, was used in construction for decades. Workers in a number of industries and occupations were regularly exposed to high amounts of asbestos fibers. Although, the United States has placed heavy regulations on its use, asbestos has still not been completely banned and continues to be used.

Today, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) estimates that asbestos is still present in tens of millions of homes, government buildings, schools, etc. Asbestos has also been found naturally-occurring in the soil in several locations in the United States, sometimes in very close proximity to inhabited areas. When disturbed, asbestos particles become airborne and are easily inhaled. Scientists have identified that no amount of exposure is safe.

“Unfortunately, asbestos’ prevalence has put all of us at risk,” said Mary Hesdorffer, nurse practitioner and executive director of the Meso Foundation.

“Given the extremely long latency period for developing mesothelioma, for thousands of Americans, the damage has already been done — the asbestos has been inhaled. Now it is our responsibility to invest in prevention research and to make sure that if they develop mesothelioma, life-saving treatments and a cure are waiting for them,” added Ms. Hesdorffer.

The Meso Foundation is the only non-government funder of peer-reviewed scientific research focused on prevention, early detection, development of effective treatments, and, ultimately, a cure for this extremely aggressive cancer. To date, the Foundation has awarded over $8.7 million to research. More information is available at http://www.curemeso.org.